Disability Allyship Program

DAP aims to create a campus culture of disability allies who advocate for inclusion, access, and equity at UF and beyond. While some physical barriers are more easily identified, the most difficult barriers to address are attitudinal and deeply held beliefs.

This training will help participants gain an understanding on how society shapes our ideas and beliefs about disability and how we can challenge deficit thinking.
We will explore disability as a framework and a lived experience. We will review the history of disability and how ideas about disability have shifted throughout the years.

DAP: Student Edition 

This is a virtual threehour interactive training led by Disability Ambassador DAP peer educators. 

Upcoming Trainings

Check back for upcoming scheduled sessions.

Content Covered: The content of the programming includes opportunities for improving your self-awareness of disability, sharing knowledge on disability and disability culture (e.g., the spectrum of disability, intersectionality, recognizing and challenging ableism, understanding universal design and accommodations), participating in small group activities, asking questions, and supporting you in realizing your personal and professional definition and embodiment of disability allyship. 

DAP Goals

  • Introduce concepts of disability as a valued part of diversity and as strengths of an inclusive campus.
  • Support growth in understanding of the concepts of disability, ableism and allyship.
  • Provide a path to include disability in diversity conversations.
  • Understand Universal Design for Learning is a tool for disability inclusion

 

DAP: Faculty & Staff Edition

This workshop includes a two-hour interactive training led by Disability Resource Center staff Check back for updates on the upcoming faculty and staff DAP workshops.

Content Covered: The content of the programming includes opportunities for improving your self-awareness of disability, sharing knowledge on disability and disability culture (e.g., the spectrum of disability, intersectionality, recognizing and challenging ableism, understanding universal design and accommodations), participating in small group activities, asking questions, and supporting you in realizing your personal and professional definition and embodiment of disability allyship.